How to Create a Virtual Law Practice

Back in the early 1980s, I remember driving to work and sitting in bumper to bumper traffic. I dreamed of the day when the world would be able to work from home like we can today. In fact, not only does the dream exist today, but setting up a virtual office is also VIRTUALLY FREE.

A list I put together to help you is available at:
http://www.bankruptcylinks.info/about/free-stuff

Or, contact me directly and I can help you (often over the telephone) at 719-783-3797 or visit http://www.victoria-ring.com

Finally, below are some other excellent tips we received from Lynn Carroll, a virtual legal assistant you can learn more about at:
http://www.Carrollegal.com

Hello Victoria Ring,

I recently signed with an estate planning attorney as her virtual assistant.  She is completely sold on the virtual work concept and is moving her office to her home.  She had done some research on virtual office solutions and I thought I’d pass along some information that might be useful to other virtual assistants.

A couple of things we’ve looked at are:

Onebox: http://www.Onebox.com
Onebox lets you receive all of your voicemails, faxes and emails in one place, accessible on the internet.  You can set it up so people dial one number and the calls can be forwarded to the phone wherever you happen to be (home, cell, office).  It also has calendar and contacts.

HyperOffice: http://www.HyperOffice.com
This website provides a system for calendar, contact and document management.

Solve360:  http://www.Norada.com
This is another system for calendar, contact and document management.

My client is going with Solve360 because of the larger storage capacity.  I may set up a HyperOffice account myself to use with other clients.  I would pay for the service and just make sure my rate is high enough that it covers the added costs (in other words, I won’t bill clients separately for the service).

The virtual office solutions allow virtual assistants, virtual bankruptcy assistants and clients to collaborate on documents, create virtual client files, etc.  You can assign your client tasks, your client can assign you tasks, and you can manage projects.  For example, a virtual bankruptcy assistant could set up each client as a project or group and link all of the documents, contacts and to-dos (follow up calls, etc.)  for that client.  When petitions are completed, the virtual bankruptcy assistant could put the file on the shared space so the client could review it.  That way, the file is not going back and forth via email.

Other virtual assistants have mentioned using OfficeZilla  http://www.OfficeZilla.com There is free version and a paid version.  I would be hesitant to use the free one until I found out whether it offered a level of security.

.. published by Victoria Ring
http://www.victoria-ring.com

Comments are closed.